Steven Boggess, PhD

Steven Boggess, Kampmann Lab

[email protected]

Postdoctoral Fellow

Education

  • BS, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - California Lutheran University, 2014

  • PhD, Chemistry - University of California, Berkeley, 2019

Research Experience

  • Evan W. Miller laboratory, 2015-2019. Thesis: “Sensing the Electrical Activity of Cells through Molecular Wires by Photoinduced-Electron Transfer”

    • The Miller lab is interested in developing tools to interrogate cell membrane potential using microscopy. In my thesis work, I explored new molecular wire scaffolds as voltage-sensitive triggers in a fluorescent voltage sensitive dye.

  • John F. Tannaci laboratory, 2012-2014.

    • Developed methodology for palladium-catalyzed C-H activation direct arylation using simple model. This new methodology was utilized to improve the regioregularity of conjugated polymers for use in photovoltaics..

 

Publications

List of publications on PubMed

  1. Boggess, S.C.; Lazzari-Dean, J.; Raliski, B.; Mun, D. M.; Li, A.; Miller, E. W. “Conformational Flexibility Enhances Sensitivity in Fluorescein-Based Voltage Indicators.” ChemRxiv. 2020, Preprint, DOI: 10.26434/chemrxiv.11764368

  2. Boggess, S.C.; Gandhi, S.S.; Siemons, B.A.; Huebsch, N.; Healy, K.E.; Miller, E.W.; “New Molecular Scaffolds for Fluorescent Voltage Indicators.” ACS Chemical Biology 2019, 14 (3), 390-396; DOI: 10.1021/acschembio.8b00978

  3. Franke, J. M.; Raliski, B. K.; Boggess, S. C.; Natesan, D. V.; Koretsky, E. T.; Zhang, P.; Kulkarni, R. U.; Deal, P. E.; Miller, E. W.; "BODIPY fluorophores for membrane potential imaging." J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2019, 141(32), 12824-12831; DOI 10.1021/jacs.9b05912

  4. Huebsch, N.; Charrez, B.; Siemons, B.; Boggess, S.C.: Wall, S.; Charwat, V; Jaeger, K.; Montiel, F.L.T.; Jefferys, N.C.; Deveshwar, N.; Edwards, A.; Serrano, J.; Snuderl, M.; Stahl, A.; Tveito, A.; Miller, E.W.; Healy, K.E.; “Metabolically-Driven Maturation of hiPSC-Cell Derived Heart-on-a-Chip.” bioRxiv, 2018; DOI: 10.1101/485169

 

Research Interests

Synaptic dysfunction has been identified as an important element in many diseases of the central nervous system, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. I am interested in studying the genetic factors that lead to synaptic dysfunction by combining arrayed genomic screens and functional imaging of neuronal activity.